This post is co-written by Gary Van Cleve, Mitchell Simonson and Josh Folland

This unprecedented time of pandemic has brought social interaction to an abrupt halt with cautious open-up just beginning.  Americans have had to learn to live, work, educate their children, recreate, shop and otherwise transact business—all while social-distancing, self-isolating and not being physically

Introducing our new CapWatch podcast series which is an extension of the Larkin Hoffman Podcast Briefing series. In this series, we discuss the end of Minnesota’s 2020 legislative session and the special session in June. The CapWatch podcasts cover the political dynamics at the Minnesota Capitol and give an overview of the policy and spending

Clouds are gathering now on the payment horizon for the construction industry.  The clouds converging now and into the fall call for even greater attention to protecting construction industry receivables. This applies to the industry from top to bottom.  Construction was an “essential business” allowed to continue operating in Minnesota. That designation allowed work to

On June 10, 2020, the Minnesota Supreme Court issued a decision affirming the Court of Appeals and upholding the determination that the Minneapolis Paid Sick and Safe Time Ordinance (“Ordinance”) applies to employers outside of Minneapolis, finding that the Ordinance was not preempted by state law and did not violate the extraterritoriality doctrine.

In 2016,

  1. Notify Your Insurer.

    Typically, property insurance policies require notice of a claim as soon as practicable. Notice requires a description of when, where and what happened to result in a claim.  If you have a loss, put your insurer on notice immediately.

  2. File a Police Report.

    Make sure to file a police report.  Many policies

COVID-19 and the stay at home mandates have had a devastating impact on the business community. Many business owners are looking to their business interruption and other insurance to cover the losses but finding insurers are asserting various coverage issues and exclusions. Paul Smith and Chris Yetka shine a light on what to look for

This is the third post in a four-part series discussing labor and employment law issues that should be considered when a company decides to buy another business.  My last post addressed withdrawal liability when a company acquires the assets of a business which contributes to a multiemployer pension plan pursuant to a collective bargaining agreement.

On May 18th, the SBA issued guidance on PPP loan forgiveness in the form of an application for such forgiveness. This podcast reviews and analyzes this guidance describing both opportunities and pitfalls. The SBA just released an application for loan forgiveness as the form of guidance on this area of issues. While some new issues