Legislative and Judicial Updates

On June 10, 2020, the Minnesota Supreme Court issued a decision affirming the Court of Appeals and upholding the determination that the Minneapolis Paid Sick and Safe Time Ordinance (“Ordinance”) applies to employers outside of Minneapolis, finding that the Ordinance was not preempted by state law and did not violate the extraterritoriality doctrine.

In 2016,

On May 18th, the SBA issued guidance on PPP loan forgiveness in the form of an application for such forgiveness. This podcast reviews and analyzes this guidance describing both opportunities and pitfalls. The SBA just released an application for loan forgiveness as the form of guidance on this area of issues. While some new issues

Peter Coyle and Jacob Steen discuss the land use, government relations and regulatory environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. They share examples of how Larkin Hoffman has been able to assist clients in overcoming the unique challenges presented by a statewide stay-at-home order and discuss the ways that the global pandemic has shaped the local land

Under Minnesota law, a contractor may collect reasonable attorneys’ fees in a mechanics’ lien foreclosure action even if the property is a homestead. The amount of the award is in the discretion of the court. That is not the case in every state as recently illustrated in Iowa.

Historically, Iowa has liberally construed its mechanics’

On Tuesday, February 11, 2020, the Minnesota Legislature returned to the Capitol for the start of the 2020 legislative session. Having passed a biennial state budget in 2019, this year’s “short session” will run until May 18, 2020.  With the only politically divided state legislature in the nation and all 201 legislators on the ballot

Larkin Hoffman recently hosted a forum on energy storage by Clean Energy Economy MN, a group that provides a strong and unified voice for clean energy businesses in Minnesota. The event helped explain some of the barriers and opportunities to greater adoption of energy storage in Minnesota. In this piece, guest blogger Amelia Cerling

Dave Hammargren a construction, arbitration, and surety litigation attorneyA statute of repose defines the date by which a particular type of claim must be asserted before it becomes untimely, or “stale,” and can no longer be pursued.  This provides designers and builders of construction projects some security that, after a certain date, they cannot be hauled into court to answer for their alleged

The development community has long maintained that the practice of cities exacting transportation fees or charges from developers as a condition of development approval is illegal, but the issue had not been directly and fully addressed by the courts until the Minnesota Supreme Court handed down its decision in Harstad v. City of Woodbury in