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Employment, Labor and Benefits

In light of the coronavirus, the majority of employers are allowing, if not mandating, that employees work from home (WFH). What should employers be thinking about when arranging for employees to telecommute?

  1. Determine which positions lend themselves to WFH. Obviously, some positions require face to face interaction or production with hands-on work, such as manufacturing.

Updated 3/16/2020

An employer’s response to the coronavirus pandemic can change from day-to-day, depending on guidance and recommendations issued by the CDC, state departments of health, OSHA and the World Health Organization.

The questions employers are asking are changing depending on the day, as are the answers!

Can employers question their employees about their recent

In December 2018, President Trump made his third appointment to the NLRB, giving the Republicans a majority on the five-person Board. 2019 has seen a number of Board decisions in which the Board reversed or narrowed its decisions made by a Board which was controlled by Democratic appointees.

Union Election Rules

In 2014, the NLRB

Whether a business’s employees are represented by a union or not, all builders should be concerned about the pending Protecting the Right to Organize Act (“PRO Act”) being considered by Congress.  If enacted, the PRO Act will alter fundamental principles of labor law and significantly prejudice the rights of employers. Supporters of the PRO Act

The Minnesota Legislature passed sweeping new amendments to statutes which create criminal penalties for the failure to pay wages and impose requirements for employers (including contractors) to document the terms of employment with their employees.  The new amendments took effect July 1, 2019.  Then, on August 8, Minneapolis passed an ordinance, essentially piggybacking on the

Employers have long disliked labor unions’ use of inflatable rats, large balloon cats, mock funerals and other types of dramatic protests mounted when a labor union wants to exert pressure on a company to cease doing business with the employer with whom the union has a dispute.  The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) expressly prohibits