Last year, the City of Bloomington Minnesota hired Karla Henderson to help steer the city’s redevelopment as Director of Community Development.  She is well qualified for the job since she served in Detroit Mayor Dave Bing’s inner circle and brings a wealth of experience turning around neighborhoods to her new job in Minnesota.  

Early

On a trip to Guatemala, a friend introduced me to a unique outdoor classroom, a learning lab of sorts, for those interested in sustainable agriculture.  It’s located on the shores of Lake Atitlan, a beautiful volcanic lake in the central highlands.

IMAP https://imapermaculture.org/ is short for the Mesoamerican Permaculture Institute and was founded by

Last week, I wrote a blog post predicting that President Biden may be requiring project labor agreements (PLAs) on projects funded by the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Acts, effective November 15, 2021 (link here).  That prediction has now become reality.

On Friday, February 4, 2022, President Joe Biden signed Executive Order 14063 (EO

Update:  On February 4, 2022, President Joe Biden signed an Executive Order requiring the use of PLAs on federal construction projects for which the total estimated cost is  $35 million or more.

As many construction contractors are aware, the new Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, effective on November 15, 2021, includes significant monies for transportation,

Some time ago I posted about minding the gaps that can happen where the world of common law contracts meets Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (“UCC”).  I see the same issues repeating in my work recently so it is time to revisit this topic.

The interface between common law contracts and Article 2

Many employers are adopting a mandatory COVID-19 vaccine policy, or they are required by owners, contractors, developers, or state, local or federal government to adopt such a policy for employees working on particular projects.  The recognized exceptions to mandatory vaccination policies are for employees who have a medical condition, or employees who have a religious

In cities across the country, the pandemic has brought home the plight of the homeless.  Rising home prices, job losses and economic disparity have left more and more people without viable housing options.  Communities everywhere are struggling to find alternatives to the tent cities that have sprung up in public parks and along highways.

Employers mandating that employees be vaccinated against COVID-19 should know how to respond to an employee’s request for a religious exemption from the vaccination policy.  In this post, I discuss the process an employer can use to distinguish an employee’s personal opposition to a vaccination from a sincerely held religious belief that qualifies as a

State environmental agencies continue to discover long-hidden contamination caused by companies around the country. Contamination may turn up after dredging activities, groundwater sampling or construction of new buildings on redeveloped sites. When these discoveries are made, state environmental agencies search for the source of pollution. In recent years, that research has led government agencies to

In my practice representing developers and landowners, I routinely review dozens if not more, of development agreements over the course of a year.  Without question, the most complained about aspect of virtually all such agreements, by a wide margin, is the extent of fees being imposed by a given city.  Municipal fees are the runaway

Skyrocketing construction material costs have been front-page news in recent months. Tamara O’Neill Moreland moderates a wide-ranging discussion with Ari Parritz, Managing Principal of Afton Park, and Chris Osmundson, Director of Development at Alatus, on the many trends in construction that are changing the development of projects now and into the future.

Developers have been